Coastal Wolf, by Ken Meyers

"Coastal Wolf" is created using the lost wax process of bronze sculpture. 9" tall x 16" long. It is signed and numbered by the artist as part of a limited edition of ten to be produced.

“I am a bronze sculptor based on Vancouver Island and have recently completed the first in a series of Coastal Wolf pieces. As a signature member of Artists for Conservation, I routinely pledge a percentage of sale proceeds to worthy organizations focused on the protection of at-risk species. I would love to donate to Raincoast as I sell editions of this piece!”

Ken Meyers

“Coastal Wolf” is created using the lost wax process of bronze sculpture. 9″ tall x 16″ long. It is signed and numbered by the artist as part of a limited edition of ten to be produced. Each piece is priced at $6,600.

Website: https://www.kenmeyersculpture.com/

About coastal wolves

Coastal wolves are a genetically, ecologically, and behaviourally distinct population of the gray wolf (Canis lupus). Notably, they have a greater amount of marine based protein in their diet than interior wolves, are smaller in size, and have slight but identifiable differences in coloration.

The coastal wolf can be found in southwestern Alaska and west of the Coast Mountain Range, which separates coastal from interior areas of British Columbia. In BC, this includes the Great Bear Rainforest and many islands and archipelagos in the Salish Sea. As gray wolves continue to recolonize interior areas they once inhabited in the Pacific Northwest, there is evidence of hybridization between coastal wolves and other non-coastal wolves. 

Much like their interior counterparts, coastal wolves face threats against which they have no evolved defences, including human persecution, climate change, industrial forestry, trophy hunting, increasing marine traffic, and exotic diseases. Given their unique ecological, morphological, behavioural, and genetic characteristics, scientists have recommended that coastal wolves in BC be considered an Evolutionary Significant Unit (ESU) and given special conservation status. To date, this unique strain of wolf does not receive any special protection in BC.

Links to relevant publications

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