Author: Raincoast

Raincoast is a team of conservationists and scientists empowered by our research to safeguard the lands, waters and wildlife of coastal British Columbia. We use rigorous, peer-reviewed science and community engagement to further our conservation objectives. We call this approach ‘informed advocacy’. As a charitable, non-profit conservation science organization that operates a research lab, research field station and a research/sailing vessel, we are unique in Canada.
Job opportunity: W̱SÁNEĆ Restoration Program Liaison

Job opportunity: W̱SÁNEĆ Restoration Program Liaison

Raincoast Conservation Foundation (Raincoast) is seeking a member of the W̱SÁNEĆ Community of Vancouver Island {W̱JOȽEȽP (Tsartlip), BOḰEĆEN (Pauquachin), SȾÁUTW̱,(Tsawout) W̱SIKEM (Tseycum)} out on the Saanich Peninsula and Gulf Islands of British Columbia to join the team as a Project Community Liaison for a planned restoration partnership program taking place in the fall of 2021. 
Job opportunity: TFN/Raincoast Stewardship Program Assistant

Job opportunity: TFN/Raincoast Stewardship Program Assistant

We are seeking an energetic, creative, and passionate candidate for the TFN/Raincoast Summer Student work program. The project this summer is to create and develop a new park space located on Tsawwassen First Nation lands, along with the delivery of a field-monitoring/stewardship program with assistance from Raincoast’s Education Coordinator. 
Roberts Bank Terminal 2 and the heart of the Fraser Estuary

Roberts Bank Terminal 2 and the heart of the Fraser Estuary

We continue to use technical submissions, and collaborative communication efforts with other conservation groups to inform decision makers and the public. Richmond and Delta municipalities (closest to the terminal) have also expressed their opposition, citing the environmental and human impacts from more ships and bigger terminals.
Southern Residents and recovery

Southern Residents and recovery

Raincoast’s approach to recovering Southern Resident killer whales stands on two primary tenets. First is to hold the line: to keep critical habitat in the Salish Sea from becoming further degraded. The second tenet is to reduce the immediate threats undermining their survival; lack of food, noise and disturbance from vessels, and pollutants that accumulate in their food.