Raincoast in the news, 2020

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Comment: Stronger forest protection policy needed on the Gulf Islands

By Shauna Doll and Chris Genovali, Times Colonist
2020 11 21

“One of the shortcomings of the old growth strategy review was the failure to capture any of the coastal Douglas fir zone in the interim protection measures. As such, B.C.’s least protected forest zone will continue to be subject to unsustainable, under-regulated logging and tree cutting, with its subsequent conversion to housing and commercial development.”

Genome BC Funds Genomic Project To Support Grizzly Bear Management

By Techcouver Newsdesk, Techcouver
2020 11 17

Genome BC develops and funds a new non-invasive genetic markers project providing more extensive data and evidence based management of the Grizzly Bear populations along the central coast of BC. This will allow for a replacement of the outdated and limited monitoring system previously used by First Nations and provincial governments.

Hakai magazine logo, blue version.

The Lone Wolf That Was Loved to Death

By Larry Pynn, Hakai Magazine
2020 10 27

Takaya, the lone wolf’s, unique life is described through human encounters and their stories of him, including his death and the events that led up to it and that continue to be a topic of controversy. This article is also in audio format.    

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The Lone Wolf That Was Loved to Death

By Larry Pynn, The Tyee
2020 10 27

Takaya, the lone wolf’s, unique life is described through human encounters and their stories of him, including his death and the events that led up to it and that continue to be a topic of controversy.  

Long kept secret, Canada’s ghostly spirit bears are even rarer than thought

Despite growing public interest in the bruins, scientific understanding of them is still nascent. But a recent collaborative study by the Kitasoo/Xai’xais and Gitga’at First Nations and academic researchers has revealed that the white bear is rarer and more vulnerable than previously thought.

Alexandra Harvey

By Alexandra Harvey, msn
2020 09 15

Read more about this research at Raincoast Conservation Foundation.

The Narwhal, logo.

How the Wet’suwet’en crisis could have played out differently

The appropriate acknowledgement and consideration of Indigenous law and legal customs is a constant and relevant topic and discussion in the decision making process of environmental assessments. The Narwhal elaborates on the escalation of the Coastal GasLink expressing that this escalation could have been avoided had Indigenous Law and legal customs been considered in the process.

By Stephanie Wood, The Narwhal
2020 02 20

A Rare Opportunity for a Healthier Salish Sea

By Zack Shoom, Fraser Riverkeeper
2020 01 23

Iona Island Waste Water Treatment Plant – Metro Vancouver’s largest wastewater plant – currently operates at a primary level, filtering out only large debris and dissolving some organic matter before entering the Salish Sea, therefore contaminating the environment and allowing for the introduction of microplastics to the environment. Discussions are underway regarding an upgrade to a tertiary level, the appropriate treatment level for the 207 billion litres of wastewater that enters the Salish Sea.

Black Bears Do Not Deserve this Fate

“Current conservation policies are driven by irrational fears, reluctance to inconvenience ourselves in co-existence with nature, and resistance to learning and challenging the status quo. They are rooted in antiquated myths. Bears are managed as “species” or, as government bureaucrats phrase it, “life game”, and not as living creatures with complex inner lives.”

Gosia Bryja

By Gosia Bryja, Medium
2020 01 16

Responsible raving? Jayda G on clubbing and the environment

By Davy Reed, The Face
2020 01 13

“Ever since Jayda G’s euphoric, sweaty set at Dekmantel 2017 proved her to be the most exhilarating new disco DJ on the planet, her tour schedule has been packed with international festival and club dates. She’s also boosted her profile as a producer, releasing her debut LP Significant Changes via Ninja Tune in 2019. The album sampled the biologist Misty MacDuffee, a biologist with the Raincoast Conservation Foundation, who won a court case against the Canadian government for its policies against killer whales.”

Davy Reed

By Davy Reed, The Face
2020 01 13

Why compassion must unify our call for conservation: The power of public support and protest

Wildlife management and conservation measures in New Zealand are not always with the intention of compassion towards the species under discussion. The choice of conservation methods used would achieve more support from the overall public by recognizing that “the intrinsic value of both human and animal nature “and the need for the entwining of eco-justice and social justice” offers a path to a just world.”.

By Alice Oven, Alice Animal Welfare
2020 01 05

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